Wednesday, 21 March 2012

Bengali Actress Photos

Bengali Actress Biography
Kanan Devi (Bengali: কানন দেবী) (22 April 1916 – 17 July 1992) was an Indian actress and singer. She was among the early singing stars of Indian cinema, and is credited popularly as the first star of Bengali Cinema.[1] Her singing style, usually in rapid tempo, was used instrumentally in some of the biggest hits of New Theatres, Kolkata.
Kanan Devi was born as Kanan Dassi in Howrah, West Bengal in or around 1916. In her autobiography, Kanan Devi has observed that she was born illegitimately. She belonged to a poor family and after the death of her adoptive father, she and her mother were left to earn and live on their own and had to do all sorts of work to drag on their lives.
Her name was soon changed to Kanan Bala. When she was only ten, a well wisher introduced her to Jyoti Studios where she was cast in a small role in Joydev (1926). She later worked with Radha Films, in films mainly by Jyotish Banerjee. After being noticed in Khooni Kaun and Maa (1934), she entered New Theatres, Calcutta. She came in contact of maestro Raichand Boral who coached her and familiarized her in the Hindi accent. She received her initial musical training under Ustad Alla Rakha. She was employed as a singer at the Megaphone Gramaphone Company, receiving further training under Bhishmadev Chatterjee. She later learnt Rabindra Sangeet under Anadi Dastidar. Her name was soon again changed to Kanan Devi for the purpose of films.
New Theatres's P.C. Barua wanted her to play the lead in his Devdas (1935), but, due to some reasons she could not act in the film. She later played the lead in Barua's Mukti (1937), which was perhaps her finest performance, making her the studio's top star. The films of New Theatres established her as a superhit singer. It was her association with K. C. Dey that people enjoyed the most. Kanan Devi remained the top star of New Theatres until she resigned her contract in 1941 and began to freelance in Bengali and Hindi films. M.P. Productions's Jawaab, was perhaps her biggest hit. Her song Yeh Duniya Hai Toofan Mail was well received. She repeated the same feast in Hospital (1943), Banphool (1945), and Rajlakshmi (1946).
She moved to Bombay in 1948. She was seen for the last time in Hindi cinema in Chandrashekhar (1948) with Ashok Kumar. Kanan Devi turned producer with Shrimati Pictures in 1949 and later launched the Sabyasachi Collective with the film Ananya (1949). Her own productions were mainly based on the stories of Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyay. Kanan Devi married her first husband, Shri Ashok Maitra, but their marriage was short-lived and ended in a divorce. However, she did express gratitude towards him for giving her social recognition for the first time in her life. Later, she married her second husband Haridas Bhattacharya, had her first and only child, a son, Siddharta Bhattacharya, and settled down, raising her family in Calcutta. She also worked as the president of Mahila Shilpi Mahal, an organization that helps aged and needy female artistes of the yesteryears and for the upliftment of Bengali cinema. Kanan Devi, the first lady of the Bengali screen was awarded the Dadasaheb Phalke Award for her contribution to Indian cinema, in 1976. She died on 17 July 1992 in Belle View Clinic, Calcutta when she was around seventy-six years of age.

She was born in 1934 as Ruma Ghosh. She hails from a Brahmo Bengali family. Her father was Satyen Ghosh (known as Montey Ghosh) and her mother was Sati Devi, a singer. Sati Devi's younger sister Bijoya married film director Satyajit Ray. Thakurta had her formal education in many places including Santiniketan for a brief period. She was educated first in Loretto and then in Gokhale School and thereafter Sacred Heart School, Lahore. She was also one of the earliest child students of Uday Shankar Cultural Centre in Almora in its formative years where her mother had been a music teacher. Kishore Kumar married Ruma Ghosh in May 1951 in Bombay, and their son Amit Kumar was born the following year. The couple divorced in 1958. She settled in Calcutta and married Arup Guha Thakurta and had two children by him, Ayan and Sromana. In 1958 she set up Calcutta Youth Choir with Salil Chowdhury and Satyajit Ray.
[edit]Singing career
As a singer Ruma Guha Thakurta recorded a few Rabindra Sangeet like Maya Bono Biharini Harini with Kishore Kumar and Tomar Geeti Jagalo Smriti with Hemant Kumar, both in Lookochuri, Sukher Majhe tomai dekhechi in Jodi Jantem, and Potho Hara Tumi Pothika and some solo songs in Bakso Badal, Baje Karun Sure in Monihara, Momo Chitte Niti Nrite in Ponchoshor and others. HMV recorded Kotha Baire Dure, Khone Khone Mone Mone and few others. In Bangla Adunik (modern) songs genre, Guhathakurta recorded a number of songs such as, Mon Je amar kemon kemon... and Chinite parini badhu... in Polatak, Ei To Hethai Kunjo... with Kishore Kumar in Lookochuri, Jodi Akash Hote... in Ashite Asio Na (only used in film), Sukh Sari with Manna Dey in Antony Firengee, Shudhu Poth Cheye Thaka in Baghini, and the Baithaki songs in the movie Benarasi. In 1969, HMV recorded Ek Khana Megh Bheshe Elo Akase and Bathan Bathan by her, which were super hits. Her duet songs like Sajea Dopati with Bhupen Hazarika are also memorable. In the year 1993, after Satyajit Ray died, she recorded Puroskare Sommane as a tribute to him. She also sang a song as tribute to Mother Teresa, after she had died. Most of the songs sung by her is always related for awakening the society. The most excellent Bengali choral version of Ol' Man River is performed regularly on their concerts by Calcutta Youth Choir arranged by RumaDevi. Other noted songs include Tomar Amar Thikana, Ei Amader Desh, Bharat Jai Jan, Sare Jahan Se Accha, etc. The Bengali version of We Shall Overcome, translated by Shibdas Bandyopadhyay, Ek Din Surjyer Bhor (literally translated as "One Day The Sun Will Rise") was recorded by the Calcutta Youth Choir arranged by Guhathakurta during the 1971 Bangladesh War of Independence and became one of the largest selling Bengali records.
[edit]Acting career
Her career started in Bollywood as a child artist. Thakurta acted in more than 100 movies in Bengali. Most of her Hindi movies were released in the 1950s. She joined Bollywood as a child artist at a remuneration of 500 (US$9.98) at the age of thirteen in the Prithvi Theatre. She acted in number Hindi movies like Rajani, Raag Rang, Samar, Afsar, and Bairaag. In 1944 Devikarani gave her a break in Jowar Bhata after seeing her dance. Ritwik Ghatak wanted her to act in the lead role in his film Meghe Dhaka Tara, but she was busy in shooting Rajen Tarafdar’s Ganga so she could not accept the offer. She performed as a lead actress in films such as Khaniker Athithi, Benarasi, Ashi te Asio Na, Personal Assistant, Ganga, Abhijan, Nirjan Saikate, Ponchoshor, Arogya Niketon, and Ganashatru. She performed as a supporting actress in Chele Kar, Garh Nasimpur, Baghini, Jodi Jantem, Hanghsa Mithun, Balika Badhu, Chakranto, Malabadal, Joradighir Chowdhury Paribar, Aakrosh, and Aagun. She won the award for best actress for her performance in Nirjan Saikate. She acted as a mother character in Amar Songee, Anuraher Chhonya, Troyee, Dadar Kirti, Arogya Niketon, Papee, 36 Chowringhee Lane, Amrita Kumbher Sandhane, and Srodhanjoli. She also played characters in Mega TV serials like Prabaho, Ghum Nei, and Pratibimbo. In 2006 she also acted in Mira Nair's The Namesake. She acted in Hindi Films too like Milan ( Naukadubi in Bengali) with Diliplumar and also in Mashaal.
source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruma_Guha_Thakurta

Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Bengali Actress
Actress Roopa Ganguly on Modern Bangla Film
TV9 Filmy : Bengali Actress Aindrita Ray Wants To Open A Restaurant Or Zoo

No comments:

Post a Comment

Post a Comment